George Washington on His Knees


Its been written that the most sublime figure in American history was George Washington on his knees in the snow at Valley Forge. He personified a people who knew that it was not enough to depend on their own courage and goodness, that they must seek help from God — their Father and Preserver. Where did we begin to lose sight of that noble beginning, of our convictions that standards of right and wrong do exist and must be lived up to?

Ronald Reagan, Feb. 9, 1982, National Religious Broadcasters Annual Convention

The State of the Nation Depends upon the State of the Church


If the Church languishes, the State cannot be in health; and if the State rebels against its Lord and King, the Church cannot enjoy His  favor. If the Holy Spirit is withdrawn from the Church, He is not present in the State; and if He, the only ‘Lord, the Giver of Life,’ be absent, then all order is impossible, and the elements of society lapse backward to primeval night and chaos … I charge you, citizens of the United States, afloat on your wide sea of politics, there is another King, one Jesus: the safety of the State can be secured only in the way of humble and whole-souled loyalty to His person and of obedience to His law.

A.A. Hodge (1823-1886)

A Godly Path Is the Essence of Liberty


While never willing to bow to a tyrant, our forefathers were always willing to get to their knees before God. When catastrophe threatened, they turned to God for deliverance. When the harvest was bountiful, the first thought was thanksgiving to God. Prayer is today as powerful a force in our nation as it has ever been. We as a nation should never forget this source of strength. And while recognizing that the freedom to choose a Godly path is the essence of liberty, as a nation we cannot but hope that more of our citizens would, through prayer, come into a closer relationship with their Maker.

Ronald Reagan, Mar. 19, 1981, National Day of Prayer proclamation

The Effects of Grace


Grace does not merely aid righteous conduct; it also aids in the apprehension of the never-diminishing and nondeterred love of God that makes human righteousness possible. If obedience were merely a defensive posture that [Christians] assume to avert divine wrath or to curry divine favor, then human holiness would be but a euphemism for selfishness. When self-protection and self-promotion become the primary motivations of Christian obedience or preaching, then we have inadvertently made self-satisfaction the Lord of our faith.

Brian Chapell, Christ-centered Preaching, p. 314.