God Did This Because We Were Hateful Rebels

It was come to this: either we must die eternally, or the Son of God must spill his blood; either we, or God’s own Son must suffer God’s wrath, one of the two; either miserable worms of the dust that had deserved it, or the glorious, amiable, beautiful, and innocent Son of God.

The fall of man brought it to this; it must be determined one way or t’other and it was determined, by the strangely free and boundless grace of God, that this his own Son should die that the offending worms might be freed, and set at liberty from their punishment, and that justice might make them happy. Here is grace indeed; well may we shout, “Grace, grace!” at this.

And beside, God did not do this for friends, but for enemies and haters of him. He did not do it for loyal subjects, but for rebels; he did not do it for those that were his children, but for the children of the devil; he did not do it for those that were excellent, but for those that were more hateful than toads or vipers; he did not do it for those that could be any way profitable or advantageous to him, but for those that were so weak, that instead of profiting God, they were not able in the least to help themselves.

God has given even fallen man such a gift, that He has left nothing for man to do that he may be happy, but only to receive what is given him. Though he has sinned, yet God requires no amends to be made by him; He requires of him no restoration; if they will receive His Son of Him, He requires neither money nor price; he is to do no penance in order to be forgiven. God offers to save him for nothing, only if he will receive salvation as it is offered; that is, freely through Christ, by faith in Him.

Jonathan Edwards, Works of Jonathan Edwards

HT: Reformed Quotes

Cosmic Treason

Any sin is more or less heinous depending upon the honor and majesty of the one whom we had offended.  Since God is of infinite honor, infinite majesty, and infinite holiness, the slightest sin is of infinite consequence.  The slightest sin is nothing less than cosmic treason when we realize against whom we have sinned.

Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758)

The Banquet House

Christ is not only a remedy for your weariness and trouble, but he will give you an abundance of the contrary, joy and delight. They who come to Christ, do not only come to a resting-place after they have been wandering in a wilderness, but they come to a banqueting-house where they may rest, and where they may feast. They may cease from their former troubles and toils, and they may enter upon a course of delights and spiritual joys.

Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758)

Christ Condescends To Wash Our Feet

If one worm be a little exalted above another, by having more dust, or rather a bigger dunghill, how much does he make of himself! What a distance does he keep from those that are below him! And a little condescension is what he expects should be made much of, and greatly acknowledged. Christ condescends to wash our feet; but how would great men, (or rather bigger worms,) account themselves debased by acts of far less condescension!

Jonathan Edwards, The Excellency of Christ

Your Unchangeable Friend

You may greatly comfort yourself that you have an unchangeable friend in Christ Jesus.  From the unchangeableness of your Savior, you may be assured of your continuance in a state of grace.  As to yourself, you are so changeable, that, if left to yourself, you would soon fall utterly away. But Christ is the same, and therefore, when he has begun a good work in you he will finish it. As he has been the author, he will be the finisher of your faith.

When once you have entered on the happiness of heaven, it never shall be taken from you, because Christ, your Savior and friend, who bestows it on you, and in whom you have it, is unchangeable.  He will be the same forever and ever, and therefore so will be your happiness in heaven.

Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758)

Words Are Cheap

Passing affections easily produce words; and words are cheap; and godliness is more easily feigned in words than in actions. Christian practice is a costly, laborious thing. The self-denial that is required of Christians, and the narrowness of the way that leads to life, does not consist in words, but in practice. Hypocrites may much more easily be brought to talk like saints, than to act like saints.

Jonathan Edwards, The Religious Affections, p. 332