Daily Failures and Sins

[The believer] has, indeed, his daily failures and sins, which must needs be confessed and put away; but his confessions are those of a child at the feet of his father, and the Father’s forgiveness in the death of Christ washes off those daily sins, and thus he is kept clean every whit (John 13.10). He never becomes and accused culprit at the bar of Justice. His appreciative sense of the Father’s love of him will ever prompt him to be sensitive to sin, and cause him to purify his daily conduct; or, if his appreciations grow faint and feeble, and thereby he be betrayed into more or less carelessness of living, then will the Father deal with him according to a father’s discipline, but he remains uncharged. God is no longer his judge, having already judged him in Christ. He is accused of nothing and never again condemned. His daily failures are dealt with in the intercourse of Father and Son. Perfect in the perfectness of Christ, the Father sees him as without blemish, and feels for him the very endearment with which He looks upon His Only Begotten and Well Beloved. Uncharged of every claim, all his life long, is he who is in Christ.

W. R. Nicholson, Oneness with Christ (Chicago: Bible Institute Colportage Assoc, 1903), 116-117.

How Could We Ever Be Sure about Anything?

We need not wonder that so much importance is attached to our Lord’s resurrection. It is the seal and memorial stone of the great work of redemption, which He came to do. It is the crowning proof that He has paid the debt He undertook to pay on our behalf, won the battle He fought to deliver us from hell, and is accepted as our guarantee and our substitute by our Father in heaven.

Had He never come forth from the prison of the grave, how could we ever have been sure that our ransom had been fully paid (1 Corinthians 15:17)? Had He never risen from His conflict with the last enemy, how could we have felt confident that He has overcome the power of death from the devil (Hebrews 2:14)? But thanks be unto God, we are not left in doubt. The Lord Jesus really rose again for our justification.

J. C. Ryle (1816-1900)