Grace and Love

Our love for God, expressed through obedience to Him, is to be a response to His love, not a means to try to earn it.

Jerry Bridges, Transforming Grace (Colorado Springs: NavPress, 1991), 88.

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The Kingdom Comes When the King Is Honored

“Thy will be done.” And with what better comment upon the words can I begin than this from John Calvin: “The substance of the prayer is that God would enlighten the world by the light of His Word, would form the hearts of men by the influence of His Spirit, and would restore to order, by the gracious exercise of His power, all the disorder that exists in the world.” John Calvin thus brings us to a very definite conception as to what the prayer implies. The Kingdom comes just as God’s thought and Spirit become dominant — His grace pervading human affection, His counsel illumining human judgment, His purpose fashioning human desire. His will controlling human movement. The Kingdom comes when His throne is revered, and when “the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne” constrains our wills in glad and spontaneous obedience. The Kingdom comes just as human relationships are shaped and beautified by the character of God, His righteousness expressed in our rectitude, His grace flowering in our graciousness, and His love finding a witness in everything lovely and of good report. The Kingdom comes when the King is honored and when His statutes become our songs.

J. H. Jowett, Things That Matter Most