Forever Indebted

We owe this freedom of choice and action to those men and women in uniform who have served this nation and its interests in time of need. In particular, we are forever indebted to those who have given their lives that we might be free.

Ronald Reagan, remarks on May 26, 1983

The Oddity of Memorial Day

It is, in a way, an odd thing to honor those who died in defense of our country in wars far away. The imagination plays a trick. We see these soldiers in our mind as old and wise. We see them as something like the Founding Fathers, grave and gray-haired. But most of them were boys when they died, they gave up two lives — the one they were living and the one they would have lived. When they died, they gave up their chance to be husbands and fathers and grandfathers. They gave up their chance to be revered old men. They gave up everything for their county, for us. All we can do is remember.

Ronald Wilson Reagan, Remarks at Veteran’s Day ceremony, Arlington National Cemetery Arlington, Virginia, November 11, 1985

The Law Is a Gift from God

image-911crossIt’s not good enough to have equal access to our law; we must also have equal access to the higher law — the law of God. George Washington warned that morality could not prevail in exclusion of religious principles. And Jefferson asked, ‘Can the liberties of a nation be thought secure, when we’ve removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of people that these liberties are the gifts of God?’ We must preserve the noble promise of the American dream for every man, woman, and child in this land. And make no mistake, we can preserve it, and we will. That promise was not created by America. It was given to America as a gift from a loving God — a gift proudly recognized by the language of liberty in the world’s greatest charters of freedom: our Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.

Ronald Reagan, Aug. 1, 1983, annual meeting of the American Bar Association, Atlanta, GA

Liberty Springs from an Abiding Faith in God

The public expression through prayer of our faith in God is a fundamental part of our American heritage and a privilege which should not be excluded by law from any American school, public or private. One hundred fifty years ago, Alexis de Tocqueville found that all Americans believed that religious faith was indispensable to the maintenance of their republican institutions. Today, I join with the people of this nation in acknowledging this basic truth, that our liberty springs from and depends upon an abiding faith in God.

Ronald Reagan, May 17, 1982, in a proposed Constitutional amendment for prayer in schools

George Washington on His Knees

Its been written that the most sublime figure in American history was George Washington on his knees in the snow at Valley Forge. He personified a people who knew that it was not enough to depend on their own courage and goodness, that they must seek help from God — their Father and Preserver. Where did we begin to lose sight of that noble beginning, of our convictions that standards of right and wrong do exist and must be lived up to?

Ronald Reagan, Feb. 9, 1982, National Religious Broadcasters Annual Convention

A Godly Path Is the Essence of Liberty

While never willing to bow to a tyrant, our forefathers were always willing to get to their knees before God. When catastrophe threatened, they turned to God for deliverance. When the harvest was bountiful, the first thought was thanksgiving to God. Prayer is today as powerful a force in our nation as it has ever been. We as a nation should never forget this source of strength. And while recognizing that the freedom to choose a Godly path is the essence of liberty, as a nation we cannot but hope that more of our citizens would, through prayer, come into a closer relationship with their Maker.

Ronald Reagan, Mar. 19, 1981, National Day of Prayer proclamation

State Neutrality

School starts today in our school district.  In honor of this day, here is a post from Ronald Reagan.

Former Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart noted if religious exercises are held to be impermissible activity in schools, religion is placed at an artificial and state-created disadvantage… Refusal to permit religious exercises is seen not as the realization of state neutrality, but rather as the establishment of a religion of secularism.

Ronald Reagan

Rebuilding America

The book of St. John tells us, ‘For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.’ … We also have His promise that we could take to heart with regard to our country — ‘That if my people who are called by my name humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then will I hear from heaven and will forgive their sins and heal their land.’ … To preserve our blessed land, we must look to God….Rebuilding America begins with restoring family strength and preserving family values.

Ronald Reagan, Feb. 9, 1982, National Religious Broadcasters Annual Convention

Memorial Day 2012

Winston Churchill said of those he knew in World War II they seemed to be the only young men who could laugh and fight at the same time. A great general in that war called them our secret weapon, “just the best darn kids in the world.” Each died for a cause he considered more important than his own life. Well, they didn’t volunteer to die; they volunteered to defend values for which men have always been willing to die if need be, the values which make up what we call civilization. And how they must have wished, in all the ugliness that war brings, that no other generation of young men to follow would have to undergo that same experience.

As we honor their memory today, let us pledge that their lives, their sacrifices, their valor shall be justified and remembered for as long as God gives life to this nation. And let us also pledge to do our utmost to carry out what must have been their wish: that no other generation of young men will every have to share their experiences and repeat their sacrifice.

Ronald Reagan — Memorial Day speech, May 31, 1982