The Triumph of Christ’s Love

The resolute purpose of our Lord exemplified His devotion to duty, it showed not less clearly the triumph of His love. For in this case duty was the offspring of love; love undertook the obligation; and all through His life, and especially at its close, love and duty went hand in hand. At the end, the triumph of love was all the greater, because the wickedness it had to conquer was so frightful. Cold floods fell upon a warm heart, but the heart remained as warm as ever. At Calvary, men seemed to defy the love of Christ. They did every conceivable thing to turn it into hatred. But the endurance of Christ showed that no impression had been made on it. His was love that many waters could not quench, and that floods could not drown.

W. G. Blaikie, Glimpses of the Inner Life of Our Lord

If Jesus Needed Prayer, Don’t We?

The great prayerfulness of Jesus arose from the human feeling of dependence, from His sense of need. Who can be at a loss to draw the inference? If Jesus felt His dependence, His need of daily stores from heaven, how much more cause have we to feel the same? If He, with His sinless nature, needed to pray, how much more we, shapen in iniquity and conceived in sin? If He needed it, in whom the prince of this world could find nothing, how much more we to whom he find access through every organ of our body — we might almost say through every pore of our skin? If He needed it, without one besetting sin, how much more we who are so troubled by the law in our members that wars against the law of our mind, and brings us into captivity to the law of sin in our members? If He needed it, who had devoted Himself heart and soul to the Father’s work and the Father’s will, how much more we who are so prone to unworthy compromises with our own inclinations, and who have such constant occasion to cry out, “Iniquities prevail against us”?

W. G. Blaikie, Glimpses of the Inner Life of Our Lord

Private Prayer Leads to Public Prayer

And if we thus value prayer in secret, we shall be the more ready to prize opportunities of social and public prayer. We shall be delighted to have others backing us in our wrestlings, and we shall have a deeper assurance of the efficacy of the process. We shall come to fed that in reply to these unseen but earnest traffickings with heaven there comes down to us a real wealth, the most precious of all treasures; the time is not wasted, but leads to glorious gain — gain more glorious than if we carried away from the mercy seat handfuls of literal gold; seeing that what we get is not the gold that perisheth, but the treasures of heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, nor thieves break through and steal.

W. G. Blaikie, Glimpses of the Inner Life of Our Lord